This Happened—Now What? You Have a Choice!

This Happened—Now What? You Have a Choice!

How you choose to think about a situation is going to determine how quickly and successfully you move through it.

This applies to many areas in life: money, relationships, work, comments you overhear, things you read on the Internet, and so much more.

You have the power to choose how deeply you internalize any situation and while it may take some practice, each time you rise above what is happening and view it more objectively, your skill level increases.

Here is what I discovered

You can’t change the past, but you can change the energy you allow it to own.

Having been a student of life, all my life, I learned much of what I know from observing others and how they react and respond to people and circumstances.

Not to say I haven’t learned from my own experiences as well, but it seems easier, or perhaps more clear to notice others first and then in reflection, ask yourself what you would do in the same situation.

You can go forward, backward, or do nothing.

Consider these options

  • You can dwell on the situation, letting it fester and make you sick emotionally (and physically.)
  • You can seek out more information to understand what occurred and if it is a situation that can be resolved.
  • You can accept where you are and move forward, onward and upward.

I’m not saying forget something happened. That’s how we learn and make different choices in the future. But the energy doesn’t need to have an emotional charge that brings us down.

This is why I recommend looking at it from a different view—as if you were not part of the equation and you were only observing.

Try it and let me know if it affected you differently.

Photo: Pixabay

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Did you know that happier people can make an organization become more profitable? My workshops help people find common ground, build business bonds, and strengthen relationships.

 

1 Comment

  1. Nice post.

    Dwelling, can actually be helpful, in extreme moderation. Being anxious or worrying provides a feeling of doing “something,” compared to ignoring the issue. While seemingly stressful, it can be beneficial because you’re actively addressing the issue. Of course, this can only be valuable briefly, and must be overcome to generate opportunities and action.

    Reply

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